Make it Tangible

Have you ever found yourself feeling completely incapable of finishing a (school, work, andor personal) project, or even knowing where to begin?

Ambiguity contributes to procrastination.

If you don’t know the bounds of what you want/need to do, then the task will feel like an endless overwhelming blob of obscurity.

The simplest way to get clear on what needs to be done is to break the project down into its smallest pieces and outline a checklist. That’s not original advice. But you’d be surprised how often we (including myself) completely skip this step because we want to dive right in or don’t think we need it.

But the humble outline or checklist will highlight the way. Because the biggest feature of a checklist is it shows us what our next task is. We cross off one thing, and then we go to the next. Of course, the task has to be something doable/actionable. If the todo is “world domination” it’s gonna be pretty up in the air on how you are going to manage that. That’s why it’s important to break it down into small components as much as possible.

The more tangible a project is, the less we will get in our own way.

STAY BOLD, Keep Pursuing,

— Josh Waggoner | Daily Blog #1264

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The Quiet Solution

“The monotony and solitude of a quiet life stimulates the creative mind.”

Albert Einstein

When I’m looking for answers to problems, I usually seek out a book or find someone who’s had a similar experience. But that’s not always the way to go. More input isn’t necessarily beneficial.

Sometimes all we need is to sit alone in a room with ourselves, or out in the woods to find the answer we need.

As Thomas Edison once said, “The best thinking has been done in solitude. The worst has been done in turmoil.”

We might already have the answer we are looking for, we just can’t see it because we are too caught up in issue and the day to day business life.

Go talk a walk outside without your phone.

Sit in a silent room with some paper and a pen.

Find a quiet place to gather your thoughts and intentionally think and feel things through.

And it’s not just problems that solitude can cure. Some of my best ideas came from sitting alone in a room—reading, writing, thinking through my experiences.

STAY BOLD, Keep Pursuing,
— Josh Waggoner | Daily Blog #931

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Head Games

“Thinking is easy, acting is difficult, and to put one’s thoughts into action is the most difficult thing in the world.”

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Creativity is 90% head games.

Sure, we have to act on our imagination to make it real. But the biggest thing that holds us back (or elevates us higher) is how we think.

Thinking touches every aspect of what we do. Even when we are not actively thinking about it, our brains are thinking about it for us.

What is procrastination but thinking you don’t have what it takes or thinking you’d rather do something else instead? What is a distraction but us thinking and processing the world around us? What is creative fear but mental uneasiness with the unknown and doubt about ourselves?

“The most common way people give up their power is by thinking they don’t have any.”

Alice Walker

That’s why habits and rituals are so important. They give us the opportunity to get us out of our heads so that we can focus on creating. When you streamline everything around your creative habit, you remove all the head games that can derail you from doing the work.

STAY BOLD, Keep Pursuing,
— Josh Waggoner | Daily Blog #806

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