Expensive Habits

“Your net worth to the world is usually determined by what remains after your bad habits are subtracted from your good ones.”

Benjamin Franklin

An expensive habit is anything we routinely do that gives us some instant value in the short-term but cost us in the long run.

Here’s a small example: choosing to sign up for a monthly membership service—like website hosting, or an online learning platform—over a yearly membership (—or not signing up at all). 

We same money in the short term (ex/ $18 instead of $150) but after 12 months of $18, we’re actually paying $216.

Another low hanging fruit (pun intended) is food. It’s soooo much more cheap and convenient to grab a pizza to go or whip it into the fast-food line instead of planning and prepping nutritious food. Junk food is cheaper, taster, and quicker—but you’ll pay for it tenfold in the end with fat, health issues, low energy, and pain. 

Expensive habits borrow from our future to give us convince and satisfaction in the present.

The other issue with expensive habits is how short there satisfaction really is. Buying another pair of shoes will make you feel great in the short term, but after 6 months of use, they’ll start to look worn and stale.

Think about everything you do as a form of investment. You might not see an immediate return on investment if you focus on nutrition and exercise, or spend money on personal development or work daily on a new skill, but you will eventually start seeing a return.

Good habits bring joy and benefit in the future, which means if we keep investing in them they will cycle down to the present as well. Investing in your health will not only give you longevity, once you get into the swing of things it will also give you energy and other benefits in the present.

STAY BOLD, Keep Pursuing,
— Josh Waggoner | Daily Blog #952

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Bad Habits x 2

“Your net worth to the world is usually determined by what remains after your bad habits are subtracted from your good ones.”

Benjamin Franklin

Bad habits define us as much (if not more than) our good habits.

They also double-dip: we get the downsides of doing them plus the negative effect of not doing the good alternatives instead.

For example, eating junky food not only has the downsides of upping your sweatpants from a large to a double xl, it also reduces your energy and abilities by not giving you the nutrients you need. The downsides of the bad and the lack of upsides from the good.

Same goods for all habits. A good habit provides benefits that lead to more opportunities for benefits—a bad habit produces side effects while taking away the benefits you would have received from doing the better opposite.

This can stack up in all sorts of unfortunate or fortunate ways.

This is the underlying pattern of why having money gives you more opportunities to create more money. And why your environment and the people you surround yourself with is so important to your overall wellbeing and success.

The key is replacing all of your bad habits with good ones before your bad habits take your lunch AND eat it too.

Make a list of all your habits. Big, small, conscious, subconscious—whatever you can think of.

Then, mark the ones you think are negatively impacting you. It’s okay if you aren’t one hundred percent sure.

Start with a win. What’s a low hanging fruit you can easily pick and feel good about?

STAY BOLD, Keep Pursuing,
— Josh Waggoner | Daily Blog #936

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Too Much of a Good Thing

“Any man who reads too much and uses his own brain too little falls into lazy habits of thinking.”

Albert Einstein

Have you ever enjoyed something too much?

I’m not talking about the bad things we enjoy. Too much of a bad thing is easy. ‘Bad’ in this case, I mean unhealthy when taken to the extreme. (Alcohol for example, which is fun socially, sure, but terrible for your health and sleep, to say the least.)

But what about too much of a good thing?

If I won the lottery tomorrow and didn’t have to work, I’d probably spend all my time reading. But is that actually beneficial? Reading is a massive enhancement on your life (and livelihood) but would spending all of my time reading amount to anything? What about exercising or building businesses or traveling or drawing or communicating or school?

Extremes are the traits you want to watch out for and adjust. I think it’s safe to say too much of anything has a diminishing value. If you find yourself repeatedly only doing one thing over and over again, perhaps it’s time to find another good habit to balance it out with.

STAY BOLD, Keep Pursuing,
— Josh Waggoner | Daily Blog #814

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