$pending

Make $100, spend $80, the result is happiness. Make $100, spend $106, the result is pure misery.

— My Reinterpretation of a Charles Dickens line.

I recently wrote a post on my entitled “Your Self-Worth is Not Your Net-Worth”. One thing that I’d like to expand upon is although money should not define who you are, we still have to take ownership of our finances.

Ignoring money problems won’t make them go away. (or any problem, not just $)

If you’re spending more than you are saving, you’ve sprung a leak somewhere. Somewhere in your daily spendings, you’re buying a lifestyle you can’t afford yet. Whatever it is you've got to find the leak first before you can stop the boat from sinking. It’s incredibly easy to do and fall into nowadays with credit. Maybe you’ve bitten off more than you can chew with a car, or maybe you’re eating your money like I am. The issue I’m working on is how to eat healthy, like stupid mega healthy, while not spending my entire paycheck on food. I don’t know the answers, but I’m going to seek out the people who do and follow their lead.

For me, spending ultimately boils down to that first sentence above. If I’m spending 100% of my monthly income on super mega foods that make me feel good, I’m still going to be miserable because I’m left with no margin.

With this kind of spending, I’m no better off financially than a homeless man who spends all of his money on beer.

I­t­ comes down to control. Who / what are you going to let determine your life? Are you going to let lack of knowledge about money control your entire life? Are you going to give your time away to everything EXCEPT that creative dream you have? Are you going others determine you’re altitude in life?’’

The more things — addictions, ignorance, lack of knowledge, and resources — control you, the less control you’ll have over your future. But the more you learn and time you spend on your strengths and downsides, the further in life you will go.

Stay BOLD, Keep Pursuing,

Josh Waggoner

IG: @Renaissance.Life

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“Annual Income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen pounds nineteen and six, result happiness. Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds nought and six, result misery.” —  Charles Dickens (Mr. Micawber in David Copperfield)