Things That Own You

Can you be a minimalist and still own a lot of things?

I believe so.

It’s not about how much you own, but why you own it.

Anything that’s not lifting you and your family up, or anything that you do not love, or allow you to more of who you are and the person/ family you want to be should be sold, donated or set on fire. (Too dramatic?)

Let’s dive into objects of intent as an example.

An object of intent is a DO. When it’s at its most effective, it’s a HABIT. It’s a regularly used thing that helps you create the life you want to create. A guitar is an object of intent. A book, juicer, sewing machine... anything that requires action. (There are also objects of un-intent as well. A TV bought for movie nights with your significant boo, or friends turned into a daily drone of endless entertainment, blocking you from what you really want out of life, like your own company, or the ability to touch your toes. A topic for another day.)

When an object of intent in your life is not used, it’s a SHOULD. It’s a reminder of something you want to do or be, but haven’t gotten around to it because, well, because. It’s a dusty guitar or unread stack of books you pass by on the way to the kitchen, an annoying little reminder of what you wish you were doing and what you are not doing.

If you’re living in an abundant part of the world, then in some place in time of your life you will have probably bought an at-home treadmill. (Or are currently thinking about buying a treadmill.) Oh the treadmill. Also known as the clothing rack. Bought on a whim, or as a New Years Resolution. The reason for the purchase was sound, but the lack of motivation and use quickly becomes a taunt and feeling that you are inadequate.

Ugh, I’ll never be fit and have buns and thighs of steel...

The question is, how many objects like this do we have around us? In our home, in our place of work?

And what’s worse, each little reminder adds up. Every object we own that’s made to be used that isn’t weighs on you. All the things we should be but aren’t. All the things we want to be but don’t have the time for. And, ironically, after spending our hard earned money on them, we are still surrounded by al the things we want but don’t have — in our own damn home.

The solution is to get rid of all the things we would label ‘SHOULDS’ and only keep the things we love, and use, but that’s stupid hard to do.

Heck, I have trouble deleting apps from my phone that I’ve never used, even I could download them again instantly.

No, I’d rather hide them away in a folder, lost to memory, and to be kept ‘just in case’. which is a silly argument I’ll make to myself.

Getting rid of shoulds takes deep consideration, and swift removal of second guessing or hesitation.

So far, I’ve been considering each item one at a time, and giving myself an ultimatum: if I don’t use this at least once this week (with an enthusiastic, non half-assed try), it’s time to part with it.

If you don’t use it, lose it

I would rather have the freedom for things owning me, rather than the maybe’s and “someday” that crowd my mind of clarity and my ability to live the life I truly want.

Plus, in the world of two day shipping, is it really all that bad to *not* own something and instead wait for when you have the room and energy to use what you buy to its fullest?

STAY BOLD, Keep Pursuing,

Josh W.

Josh Waggoner